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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

4 edition of Philosophy and revelation in the work of contemporary Jewish thinkers found in the catalog.

Philosophy and revelation in the work of contemporary Jewish thinkers

Adolph Lichtigfeld

Philosophy and revelation in the work of contemporary Jewish thinkers

by Adolph Lichtigfeld

  • 260 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by M.L. Cailingold in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Philosophy, Jewish,
  • Philosophy and religion,
  • Relevation (Jewish theology)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Dr. A. Lichtigefeld; with preface by the Very Rev. Dr. J.H. Hertz and foreword by Professor John Macmurray.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB159 .L5
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii,163p.
    Number of Pages163
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6380234M
    LC Control Number38037482
    OCLC/WorldCa2691208

    One of the major trends in modern Jewish philosophy was the attempt to develop a theory of Judaism through existentialism. Among the early Jewish existentialist philosophers was Lev Shestov (Jehuda Leib Schwarzmann), a Russian-Jewish philosopher.   Batnitzky also joins the debate regarding Strauss's influence on American politics, suggesting that an adequate understanding of Strauss's attitude toward political life depends upon keeping in view “the conceptual links between Strauss's work in medieval Jewish philosophy and his American work in the history of political philosophy” ().Author: Jerome E. Copulsky.

    One of the major trends in modern Jewish philosophy was the attempt to develop a theory of Judaism through existentialism, as exemplified by the work of Franz Rosenzweig ( - ).. Perhaps the most controversial forms of Jewish philosophy that developed in the early 20th Century was the religious naturalism of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan ( - ) whose theology was a variant of John . Franz Rosenzweig (–) ranks as one of the most original Jewish thinkers of the modern period. As a historian of philosophy, Rosenzweig played a brief but noteworthy role in the neo-Hegelian revival on the German intellectual scene of the s.

    Listed in the top ten of the most influential philosophers of the past years in a recent poll, this titan made it to fame with his book “Naming and Necessity”, where he argues that certain true statements are necessarily so, that is they cannot be conceived to be false, although they cannot be discovered just by armchair reasoning, like Author: Eno Agolli.   Most modern thinkers have thought so. God’s Revelation, they assumed, must surely be as rational as the human species that God created to receive it. But if so, what is the point of Revelation?


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Philosophy and revelation in the work of contemporary Jewish thinkers by Adolph Lichtigfeld Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Philosophy and revelation in the work of contemporary Jewish thinkers. [Adolph Lichtigfeld]. The Shape of Revelation explores the overlap between revelation and aesthetic form from the perspective of Judaism.

It does so by setting the Jewish philosophy of Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig alongside its immediate visual environment in the aesthetics of early German modernism, most notably alongside "the spiritual in art" as it appears in the art and art theories of Wassily Cited by: 9.

Philosophy and Revelation in the Work of Contemporary Jewish Thinkers. Adolph Lichtigfeld - - London: M.L. Cailingold. Revelation in Our Knowledge of : Stéphane Habib. Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas: Philosophy and the Politics of Revelation Leora Batnitzky Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas, two twentieth-century Jewish philosophers and two extremely provocative thinkers whose reputations have grown considerably, are rarely studied together.

This collection of essays examines the work of several of the most important of these figures, from the seventeenth to the late-twentieth centuries, and addresses themes central to the tradition of modern Jewish philosophy: language and revelation, autonomy and authority, the problem of evil, messianism, the influence of Kant, and feminism.

In this much-needed textbook, which surveys the most prominent thinkers of the last three centuries, Claire Katz situates modern Jewish philosophy in the wider cultural and intellectual context of its day, indicating how broader currents of British, French and German thought influenced its by: 1.

An important contribution which clarifies the often difficult area of Jewish philosophy with intellectual integrity and intelligence. offers a well-organized and thoughtful guide to the greater figures in the history of Jewish thought - Prof.

Barry W. Holtz, Jewish Theological Seminary of America This book challenges us to think about Jewish issues and appreciates the richness and thoughtfulness of the Jewish tradition.4/5(1).

The essays address themes that are central to the tradition of modern Jewish philosophy – language and revelation, autonomy and authority, the problem of evil, Messianism, the influence of Kant, and feminism – and discuss in depth the work of major thinkers such as Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Cohen, Buber, Rosenzweig, Fackenheim, Soloveitchik.

The book traces an approach to revelation found among modern Jewish thinkers such as Abraham Joshua Heschel, Louis Jacobs and Franz Rosenzweig back to biblical texts themselves. In his last work he does not intend to formulate a Jewish Philosophy of Reason, but, as the title indicates, a Religion of Reason from the sources of Judaism.

As the result of the analysis of the Jewish Religion we attain the Religion of Reason, which teaches the best ethical world order, which can only be established by an imitation of the.

Thus, postmodern Jewish thinking is thinking about God, Jews, and the world—with the texts of the Torah—in the company of fellow seekers and believers.

It utilizes the tools of philosophy, but without their modern by: The Shape of Revelation explores the overlap between revelation and aesthetic form from the perspective of Judaism. It does so by setting the Jewish philosophy of Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig alongside its immediate visual environment in the aesthetics of early German modernism, most notably alongside the spiritual in art as it appears in the art and art theories of Wassily Kandinsky.

Philosophy and Revelation in the Work of Contemporary Jewish Thinkers. Adolph Lichtigfeld - - London: M.L. Cailingold. details Judaism in Philosophy of Religion. As opposed to these two thinkers, who hold that religion and philosophy are two independently legitimate ways of recognizing truth, there are other philosophers (such as Thomas Aquinas), who are of the opinion that philosophy can only prove certain principles while other principles can only be proven by revelation.

"Modern Jewish Thinkers is a quintessential anthology, literally a “gathering of flowers” from the garden of modern Jewish thought. Greenberg has selected and translated from German and Hebrew an array of the most seminal texts, hitherto largely unavailable in English, which exemplify various trajectories of Jewish theological encounter with the challenge of modern philosophical by: 1.

REVELATION, an act whereby the hidden, unknown God shows Himself to man. To be sure, this phenomenon belongs to the realm of human reality, but it is experienced by man as coming from God.

Phenomenologically, every religion finds its starting point in a revelation. The ancient Hebrews expressed this idea in different ways. Philosophy, science, a new concern with the self, feminism, and many other modern developments and values have led modern Jewish thinkers to reassess their views of the Jewish deity.

Post-Enlightenment Jewish thinkers presented modified conceptions of God that attempted to reconcile modern philosophical trends with Jewish tradition.

The strength of this work is the basic argument Bavinck is making, and its connection to later thinkers from Van Til to Plantinga and Wolterstorff.

An important aspect of this philosophy of revelation is the argument for how revelation serves as the basis of the coherence of all intellectual inquiry. I think Rav Shalom Carmy of Yeshiva University is a pretty important figure to be aware of.

He is the editor of Tradition magazine and he has written hundreds of articles on Jewish thought and whatnot. He is not a household name outside of the YU. The biblical authors, then, prefigure modern Jewish thinkers who understand revelation as a process that incorporates both divine and human contributions.

The book’s close readings of biblical texts bolster theologies of thinkers such as Abraham Joshua Heschel, Franz Rosenzweig, and Louis Jacobs, who regard revelation not just as a top-down. gives voice to both stenographic and participatory theologies of revelation.

The Bible is the first Jewish book that valorizes yet questions revelation, but it is not the last, because certain medieval and modern Jewish thinkers make similar moves. Among modern Jews, this trend is evident in the workFile Size: KB.The latest in the series based on the popular History of Philosophy podcast, this volume presents the first full history of philosophy in the Islamic world for a broad readership.

It takes an approach unprecedented among introductions to this subject, by providing full coverage of Jewish and Christian thinkers as well as Muslims, and by taking the story of philosophy from its beginnings in the.Jewish Philosophy Past and Present: Contemporary Responses to Classical Sources is a cutting edge work of Jewish philosophy, and, at the same time, an engaging introduction to the issues that animated Jewish philosophers for centuries and to the texts that they have produced.

It is designed to set the agenda in Jewish philosophy for years to come.